Some of the nation's largest recording studios file suit, saying they want to stop a music-streaming service aimed at fitness enthusiasts from using songs by Beyoncé, Bieber and other stars

FILE - In this Oct. 15, 2016 file photo, singer Beyonce Knowles attends the Tidal X: 1015 benefit concert in New York. Some of the nation's largest recording studios have joined forces in an effort to stop Fit Radio, a music streaming service aimed at fitness enthusiasts, from using songs by Beyonce, Justin Bieber, Green Day and other stars. A representative of the Atlanta firm said in a statement Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, that it looks forward to "being vindicated by the court system." (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

By JEFF MARTIN - Associated Press
Friday, January 26th 2018, 09:43 am EDT

ATLANTA (AP) — Some of the nation's largest recording studios have joined forces in an effort to stop a music streaming service aimed at fitness enthusiasts from using songs by Beyonce, Justin Bieber, Green Day and other stars.

In a federal lawsuit filed in Atlanta, Sony Music Entertainment and more than a dozen other record companies say Fit Radio illegally infringes on their copyrighted recordings "on a massive scale."

The Atlanta-based streaming business is hurting artists who rely on music royalties, the music companies states in the suit filed recently in U.S. District Court in Atlanta. The lawsuit mentioned several major artists, including Beyonce, Jason Derulo, Green Day and others.

"Rampant copyright infringement of sound recordings over the internet and through mobile applications, including the infringement engaged in and enabled by entities such as Fit Radio, has resulted in significant harm to the music industry, including to artists who rely on royalties from recorded music for their livelihood," the complaint states.

A representative of the Atlanta firm said in a statement Tuesday that it looks forward to "being vindicated by the court system."

"We will continue providing exceptional services to our customers," it said.

Fit Radio is available through its website, fitradio.com, and through an application or app on mobile devices such as cellphones. Fit Radio recruits disc jockeys who copy and upload popular songs to attract users, the lawsuit says.

The streaming service entices the DJs to upload recordings to Fit Radio as a way for the DJs to "promote your personal brand," the lawsuit states. The company also supports the DJs with marketing efforts through Facebook and email campaigns, according to the lawsuit.

The recording companies say their music is legally streamed via services such as Apple Music and Spotify through business agreements with them. But Fit Radio is different because it has no such agreements to stream the copyrighted music, they say.

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Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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